IT'S TIME TO END COMMERCIAL NETTING OF FISH IN THE GIPPSLAND LAKES

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cobby
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Re: IT'S TIME TO END COMMERCIAL NETTING OF FISH IN THE GIPPSLAND LAKES

Postby cobby » Sat Dec 23, 2017 7:06 pm

Mingle I know what causes the weed issue, it was however one of the biggest arguements against commercial netting in both Westernport and PPB alongside the supposed dramatic rises in catch rates.

The single biggest driver in fish stock recruitment is environmental and 99.99% out of Joe Blow fishermans, both rec and pro hands to manipulate. The Whiting cycle revolves solely around ocean currents, average laval numbers in currents passing the entrances of both bays means average seasons a few years later, ditto for higher numbers creating bumper seasons. Snapper the same with freshwater influxes into the bays at spawning time. Bream, Bass and EPs rely on fresh water inflows creating a salt wedge, hence the now saltier lakes system affecting exactly just how much lavae can be sustained and ultimately survive.

Whether there is 0 tonnes or 280 tonnes of fish removed from a system annually, the biomass of recreationally sought after species will not dramatically change if the environmental factors inhibit it, which they do.



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Re: IT'S TIME TO END COMMERCIAL NETTING OF FISH IN THE GIPPSLAND LAKES

Postby Truedogz » Sat Dec 23, 2017 8:09 pm

Warrship wrote:
Firstly I would like to respond to "Mr Re-tyred" who thinks that the fish are owned by the community. They are in fact a natural resource not owned by anyone. Warrship


That's simply an emotive statement, the fish are most certainly owned, by the crown. Refer to the Fisheries Act 1995 Section 10(2): "The Crown in right of Victoria owns all wild fish and other fauna and flora found in Victorian waters."


Warrship wrote: I do not believe that conservation and sustainability are dirty words, those of you that resort to the term "greenie" as a form of personal abuse, says more about you than about me.

For anyone who is interested there is a significant archive relating to the Gippsland Fishery Edited by the late Lynton Barr. This archive is available online by searching for "Around the Jetties by Lynton Barr". The issue list goes back to 2005 until the last just prior to his passing in 2016. 104 substantive newsletters are published with the archive held on the Lake Tyers Beach website. They give a great insight into fishing in the East Gippsland Fisheries. I hope some of you maybe already familiar with the newsletter or may access it in the future. Warrship


I haven't referred to you as a 'greenie'. I am in fact a passionate conservationist, was one of the founders of a conservation organisation and part of my estate is bequeathed for conservation purposes. Lynton in fact used some information sourced from me in those publications. I stated: "I am always wary of green fundamentalism which often worships ideology rather than coming up with constructive solutions." and "I don't have a problem with an argument for the cessation of commercial fishing based on sound evidence of significant adverse environmental impacts. None have been presented, unlike the solid body of evidence for the impact of scallop dredging in the bay, etc. The whole thing smacks of a 'me too' feel good campaign."

If you want to win over people then a well reasoned argument needs to be presented including clear evidence of the nature and extent of impacts and the benefits/negatives of the proposed action and alternatives. You haven't done that.

Best Wishes

Truedogz

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re-tyred
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Re: IT'S TIME TO END COMMERCIAL NETTING OF FISH IN THE GIPPSLAND LAKES

Postby re-tyred » Sun Dec 24, 2017 5:39 am

I am pretty much done with this topic. So let's just summarize .
A number of things have been agreed on.
Natural predators take more than commercial operators.
Salt water from a permanent entrance has changed the environment.
There is far less sea grass.
There are far less sand flats for sand warm and other food.
Farming and housing around the lakes are causing changes to the water that runs into the lake.
This petition proposes to fix this by removing 10 fishing businesses that catch a small percentage of the total fish take.

I love the lakes and can say I have been to every corner of the system. I want the environment made the best it can be . This petition does nothing to address any problems in the system.
Mike G
There's nothing . . . absolutely nothing . . . half so much worth doing as simply messing around in boats.
Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows (River Rat to Mole)

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Re: IT'S TIME TO END COMMERCIAL NETTING OF FISH IN THE GIPPSLAND LAKES

Postby smile0784 » Sun Dec 24, 2017 5:54 am

re-tyred wrote:I am pretty much done with this topic. So let's just summarize .
A number of things have been agreed on.
Natural predators take more than commercial operators.
Salt water from a permanent entrance has changed the environment.
There is far less sea grass.
There are far less sand flats for sand warm and other food.
Farming and housing around the lakes are causing changes to the water that runs into the lake.
This petition proposes to fix this by removing 10 fishing businesses that catch a small percentage of the total fish take.

I love the lakes and can say I have been to every corner of the system. I want the environment made the best it can be . This petition does nothing to address any problems in the system.
Mike G


Well said
Couldn't agree more

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Re: IT'S TIME TO END COMMERCIAL NETTING OF FISH IN THE GIPPSLAND LAKES

Postby rb85 » Sun Dec 24, 2017 8:06 am

Warrship wrote:Dear all I have not responded to some of the recent posts. I have had trouble logging on numerous times over the last few days which is why I asked the administrator to put up my last post. However today I am successful.

Firstly I would like to respond to "Mr Re-tyred" who thinks that the fish are owned by the community. They are in fact a natural resource not owned by anyone. Regarding the ability to transfer commercial access licences. My assertions are based on conversation with Mr Dallas D'Silva, Manager of Policy, Science and Licencing at the Victorian Fisheries Authority.If you want an access licence there is currently one for sale with boats and all equipment on the market for $378000 through Melbourne Ship Brokers. Good Luck!
So further to the other discussions....
The most reliable indicators of available fish in the Gippsland Lakes is provided by records of commercial catch rates. Since 1989 where the commercial landed catch was 1200 tonnes (all fish) the Lakes fishery has declined to 283 tonnes in 2016, 94 tonnes of this was carp. (ref Commercial Fish Production, Victorian Fisheries Authority (VFA) 2017).

While some of the decline in commercial catch can be attributed to the reduction in commercial licences, the VFA admits to the decline. The VFA state however that the fish stocks "were stable", although at a lower level of productivity compared to the 1970s and 1980's." ref. The Gippsland Lakes fishery-An overview 2016. This document can be found at the fisheries website.

Recreational fishing figures are based on interviews with anglers, creel surveys and diarists.
The Gippsland Lakes fisheries assessment 2016, Fisheries Victoria Science Report Series No 14 ( also available on line), contains a report on a local knowledge survey. In summary, 12 surveys were distributed to recreational fishers with 4 responses. The responses included 3 angler diary participants, who fish more than fortnightly for bream in the Tambo and Mitchell rivers as well as the Nungurner and Metung areas. These respondents believe the abundance of legal sized bream has decreased in the last year due to a number of factors including commercial fishing. These diarists are regular and experienced anglers and can be expected to catch fish in a sponge! They belong to the saying "10% of the anglers catch 90% of the fish". It was disappointing that more anglers did not respond to the survey to improve the significance of the results.

I do not believe that conservation and sustainability are dirty words, those of you that resort to the term "greenie" as a form of personal abuse, says more about you than about me. I happen to believe that all the Gippsland Fisheries are an invaluable resource to be responsibly managed and not over exploited to protect them into the future.

For anyone who is interested there is a significant archive relating to the Gippsland Fishery Edited by the late Lynton Barr. This archive is available online by searching for "Around the Jetties by Lynton Barr". The issue list goes back to 2005 until the last just prior to his passing in 2016. 104 substantive newsletters are published with the archive held on the Lake Tyers Beach website. They give a great insight into fishing in the East Gippsland Fisheries. I hope some of you maybe already familiar with the newsletter or may access it in the future.

Signing out... Warrship


Ill take it. SOLD

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Re: IT'S TIME TO END COMMERCIAL NETTING OF FISH IN THE GIPPSLAND LAKES

Postby Texas » Sun Dec 24, 2017 10:08 am

This thread has been great, thanks for starting it Warrship
I thoroughly enjoyed the banter, especially from re-tyred, truedogz, cobby & smile0784
Intelligent & respectful

Cheers Gra



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Re: IT'S TIME TO END COMMERCIAL NETTING OF FISH IN THE GIPPSLAND LAKES

Postby smile0784 » Sun Dec 24, 2017 3:17 pm

rb85 wrote:
Warrship wrote:Dear all I have not responded to some of the recent posts. I have had trouble logging on numerous times over the last few days which is why I asked the administrator to put up my last post. However today I am successful.

Firstly I would like to respond to "Mr Re-tyred" who thinks that the fish are owned by the community. They are in fact a natural resource not owned by anyone. Regarding the ability to transfer commercial access licences. My assertions are based on conversation with Mr Dallas D'Silva, Manager of Policy, Science and Licencing at the Victorian Fisheries Authority.If you want an access licence there is currently one for sale with boats and all equipment on the market for $378000 through Melbourne Ship Brokers. Good Luck!
So further to the other discussions....
The most reliable indicators of available fish in the Gippsland Lakes is provided by records of commercial catch rates. Since 1989 where the commercial landed catch was 1200 tonnes (all fish) the Lakes fishery has declined to 283 tonnes in 2016, 94 tonnes of this was carp. (ref Commercial Fish Production, Victorian Fisheries Authority (VFA) 2017).

While some of the decline in commercial catch can be attributed to the reduction in commercial licences, the VFA admits to the decline. The VFA state however that the fish stocks "were stable", although at a lower level of productivity compared to the 1970s and 1980's." ref. The Gippsland Lakes fishery-An overview 2016. This document can be found at the fisheries website.

Recreational fishing figures are based on interviews with anglers, creel surveys and diarists.
The Gippsland Lakes fisheries assessment 2016, Fisheries Victoria Science Report Series No 14 ( also available on line), contains a report on a local knowledge survey. In summary, 12 surveys were distributed to recreational fishers with 4 responses. The responses included 3 angler diary participants, who fish more than fortnightly for bream in the Tambo and Mitchell rivers as well as the Nungurner and Metung areas. These respondents believe the abundance of legal sized bream has decreased in the last year due to a number of factors including commercial fishing. These diarists are regular and experienced anglers and can be expected to catch fish in a sponge! They belong to the saying "10% of the anglers catch 90% of the fish". It was disappointing that more anglers did not respond to the survey to improve the significance of the results.

I do not believe that conservation and sustainability are dirty words, those of you that resort to the term "greenie" as a form of personal abuse, says more about you than about me. I happen to believe that all the Gippsland Fisheries are an invaluable resource to be responsibly managed and not over exploited to protect them into the future.

For anyone who is interested there is a significant archive relating to the Gippsland Fishery Edited by the late Lynton Barr. This archive is available online by searching for "Around the Jetties by Lynton Barr". The issue list goes back to 2005 until the last just prior to his passing in 2016. 104 substantive newsletters are published with the archive held on the Lake Tyers Beach website. They give a great insight into fishing in the East Gippsland Fisheries. I hope some of you maybe already familiar with the newsletter or may access it in the future.

Signing out... Warrship


Ill take it. SOLD


Not that easy mate

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Re: IT'S TIME TO END COMMERCIAL NETTING OF FISH IN THE GIPPSLAND LAKES

Postby lnkfishing » Sun Jul 15, 2018 7:47 pm

I'd like to see someone do a private reconnaissance(if that's the right word) or perhaps we could set up some sort of online neighborhood watch type system to collect as much information as possible about our commercial fishers so that recreational fishers can better understand what is really happening to our fish stocks. Also, id like to see a move to ban all commercial netting within the continental shelf. long-lines give by-catch a much better chance and can be configured to almost eliminate by catch through hook size and style and float and weight tweaking.
I'd also like to see Australia adopt a more sensible approach to what I call "subsistence fishers" so as an example if you have a healthcare card or pay for eg, $200, for a subsistence fishing license, you get to use slightly better gear such as the "kon tiki" recreational long-line systems that are available currently to NZ anglers and perhaps double the daily bag limits for people who live more than an hour from the coast.

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Re: IT'S TIME TO END COMMERCIAL NETTING OF FISH IN THE GIPPSLAND LAKES

Postby lnkfishing » Mon Jul 16, 2018 2:54 pm

Dear re-tyred please explain why commercial netting can't be confined to outside the shelf?

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Re: IT'S TIME TO END COMMERCIAL NETTING OF FISH IN THE GIPPSLAND LAKES

Postby frozenpod » Mon Jul 16, 2018 7:30 pm

Who are you why are you posting here as your first post.

Your neighborhood watch plan is the stupidest thing I have heard this year.

Maybe start by showing respect to the hard working commercial fishing families of the gippsland lakes.

There are very few to no reasonable grounds presented for the removal of netters.

The Facebook page continues to post incorrect information.

I assume you are from that page/group. So as a second step get your facts straight.



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